Web: Stockgate Report – Investrend Article on Targeting of DTCC by NASAA members for Subpoenas

Web

Stockgate Report: Investrend Article on Targeting of DTCC by NASAA members for Subpoenas

Bud Burrell

FinancialWire cited by Sanity Check via Wayback, 14 February 2006

FinancialWire has learned from a highly-placed informed source that the Depository Trust and Clearing Corp. appears to be a target of an enforcement action by the multi-state task force formed by the North American Securities Administrators Association.

If so, this would explain a recent flurry of posts and press releases by the DTCC denying any complicity in the exploding national illegal manipulative trading scandal known as StockGate, embroiling Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX), Overstock (NASDAQ: OSTK), Krispy Kreme Donuts (NYSE: KKD) and Martha Stewart OmniLiving (NYSE: MSO), as well as provide a measure of validation to rampant rumors that the clearing house, jointly owned by the NASD and the New York Stock Exchange has received subpoenas.

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Web: The Death of a Thousand Cuts

Web

The Death of a Thousand Cuts

Bud Burrell

Sanity Check via Wayback, 2 February 2006

During my undergraduate studies, I read of an historical method of execution known as the Death of a Thousand Cuts. I have come to see that as a metaphor for how guerrilla wars (like ours) are won and lost.

Whether any of us have fully realized it or not, we have been engaged by an insidious enemy whose sole desire was to steal what was not theirs from others they viewed as their inferiors, rather than earn it legitimately. When a person was executed by the infliction of a thousand small cuts, the pain was enormous, eventually killing the subject by shock and loss of blood, but very, very slowly.

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Article: Who’s Looking Out For You? SEC Critics Seeking Investigation

Article - Media

Who’s Looking Out For You?: SEC Critics Seeking Investigation

Mark Faulk

FaulkingTruth cited by RGM Communications via Wayback,  27 June 2004

The mission statement of the SEC is clearly worded and easy to understand: “The primary mission of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is to protect investors and maintain the integrity of the securities market.”

Last Wednesday, they adopted new rules concerning short-selling that accomplished neither goal. Instead, they passed a watered-down version of their earlier proposed regulation SHO, a version that did absolutely nothing to “protect investors and maintain the integrity of the securities market”. And unlike their mission statement, the new rules are neither clearly worded nor easy to understand. In fact, the only clear message was the “subliminal” one that the SEC sent to investors, which was, simply stated: “We don’t care”.

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