Article: Credit Suisse Fined $1.75M for Short-Selling System Failures

Article - Media, Fined

Credit Suisse Fined $1.75M for Short-Selling System Failures

Financial Planning, 28 December 2011

Credit Suisse Securities has been fined $1.75 million by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority for failing to properly supervise short-selling activity.

From June 1, 2006 through December 2010, Credit Suisse Securities failed to comply with the locate and marking requirements of Regulation SHO as well as FINRA rules, NASD rules and federal securities laws, according to FINRA.

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Article: UBS will pay $12M over naked shorts

Article - Media

UBS will pay $12M over naked shorts

dcubberley

InvestmentNews, 27 October 2011

UBS AG, Switzerland’s biggest bank, will pay $12 million to resolve Financial Industry Regulatory Authority claims that a brokerage unit allowed millions of short-sale orders to be placed without reasonable grounds to believe that the securities could be delivered.

The supervisory system for locating and marking orders at UBS Securities LLC was “significantly flawed” and contributed to violations across its equities-trading business, Washington- based Finra said in a statement today. The company’s framework wasn’t designed for regulatory compliance until at least 2009, the industry-funded brokerage watchdog said.

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Testimony: Bud Burrell Comments on Amendments to Regulation SHO

Testimony

Bud Burrell Comments on Amendments to Regulation SHO

SEC, 13 July 2008

“August 1973 I started on Wall Street in Block Trading for Bache. Worked in all Major firms through the years.Traveled all over the world.

From $6 Billion per day Fails to deliver is now Over $13 1/2 billion per day.

There is More Naked Short shares in the market than there is Outstanding Shares.

We have allowed our Clearing systems to be Gamed, to the point where they are able to manipulate markets.”

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Article: Refco – When Smart Money Isn’t So Smart

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Refco: When Smart Money Isn’t So Smart

Matthew Goldstein

Bloomberg, 16 July 2007

The titans of the private equity world fancy themselves smarter, shrewder, and more sophisticated than any one else on Wall Street. Investors have bought into the sentiment as they’ve scooped up the shares of the private equity firms that have gone public recently: Blackstone Group (BX) and Fortress Investment Group (FIG). But a recent report on the spectacular collapse of Refco—the once-dominant commodities broker that was laid waste by a massive accounting fraud—paints an unflattering portrait of the private equity firm that engineered Refco’s August, 2004, leveraged buyout and its initial public offering a year later (see BusinessWeek.com, 7/11/07, “Kill the Private-Equity Tax Break”).

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Article: Naked and Confused

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Naked and Confused

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 12 February 2007

How a tiny software outfit fell victim to an illegal but unrestrained practice known as naked short-selling.

Most investors have never heard of Sedona (otcbb: SDNA.OB news people ) Corp., a piddling Pennsylvania outfit that sells customer relationship management software for small U.S. banks and credit unions. But to a rogue band of short-selling hedge fund managers, Sedona was prime meat.

Article: Naked Short Selling – How Exposed Are Investors?

Article - Academic

Naked Short Selling: How Exposed are Investors?

James W. Christian, Robert Shapiro, John-Paul Whalen

The Houston Law Review, 10 November 2006

Regulation SHO is a start, but in order to guarantee a fair market place, the SEC must close the loopholes in Regulation SHO and institute comprehensive reforms to the clearing and settlement system. Until the SEC makes these necessary reforms and addresses the DTCC’s mismanagement of the Stock Borrow Program, investors will continue to be exposed to the manipulative potential of naked short selling.

PDF (58 Pages):  HLR Naked Short Selling 2006-11-10

Article: Naked [Short Selling] Horror

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Naked Horror

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 25 August 2006

Suspicious trading last year in shares of Global Links, a small Nevada real estate holding company, was far more intense than previously thought.

Data released to Patch earlier this month had shown trade fails of 10 million shares starting in mid-April, a time when 4 million shares of Global Links were issued and outstanding.

Article: Congress Sells America Short

Article - Media

Congress Sells America Short

Mark Faulk

FaulkingTruth.com cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 20 September 2005

In yet another twist in the stock market scandal known as Stockgate, the Faulking Truth has learned that Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL), Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, has shelved a planned Senate Subcommittee Hearing investigating the issue. Originally scheduled for February of this year, and then postponed several times, the hearing, which has been advocated by Senator Robert Bennett (R-UT), has been cancelled indefinitely.

According to a reliable source inside of the planned investigation, “The authority and the responsibility to take the necessary steps to deal with the issue of naked short selling lies squarely at the feet of Senator Shelby, and he has chosen not to allow the planned Senate Banking Subcommittee hearing to go forward.” In an earlier interview with the same source, we were told that “Senator Shelby tends to grab things like this for his own purposes, and his own purposes don’t always mesh with what’s best for the public.”

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Article: The Naked Truth on Illegal Shorting

Article - Media

The Naked Truth on Illegal Shorting

Karl Thiel

The Motley Fool cited  by RGM Communications via Wayback, 24 March 2005

It’s amazing how the word “naked” can liven up a discussion. Take naked short selling, for instance. The addition of this saucy little word turns the mundane act of borrowing and selling shares of stock in hopes of buying them back later at a lower price into a raging controversy fraught with conspiracy, secret identities, public recriminations, foreign intrigue, sports team owners, and now some of the top regulators in the land.

How can one word cause so much trouble? While legal short sellers must borrow the shares they sell, naked short sellers sell shares of stock they haven’t borrowed, have no intention of borrowing, and that may not even exist. Not surprisingly, this activity is illegal and has been since the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. But for a number of reasons, regulators have overlooked it in the past.

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