Media: Mark Faulk

Media

Mark Faulk is an Oklahoma City filmmaker and Occupy OKC activist. He is the founder and contributing editor of the faulkingtruth.com, an advocacy site for political reform. After he exposed the fact that American companies were being listed and sold on the Berlin Stock Exchange without their knowledge or permission, more than 200 of them petitioned the German government to be removed from that Exchange. Faulk published a book i 2008 titled, The Naked Truth: Investing in the Stock Play of the Lifetime.

WayBack Archives of FaulkingTruth.com

 

Article: Naked Shorting Will Cause U.S. Exchange Exodus

Article - Media

Naked Shorting Will Cause U.S. Exchange Exodus

Bud Burrell

Financial Wire, 5 August 2010

This week, an important online news service released an article that should send shockwaves into our public markets. In very curt form, the article chronicles the many abuses of U.S. public companies by short selling manipulators, particularly through naked short selling and regular and derivative based synthetic shorting. By implication, the article recites the sheer embarrassing ineffectiveness of our regulators, who are engaged in a pattern of systematic conflicts of interest with revolving doors that are a major disgrace to our own government.

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Web: The Death of a Thousand Cuts

Web

The Death of a Thousand Cuts

Bud Burrell

Sanity Check via Wayback, 2 February 2006

During my undergraduate studies, I read of an historical method of execution known as the Death of a Thousand Cuts. I have come to see that as a metaphor for how guerrilla wars (like ours) are won and lost.

Whether any of us have fully realized it or not, we have been engaged by an insidious enemy whose sole desire was to steal what was not theirs from others they viewed as their inferiors, rather than earn it legitimately. When a person was executed by the infliction of a thousand small cuts, the pain was enormous, eventually killing the subject by shock and loss of blood, but very, very slowly.

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Article: Congress Sells America Short

Article - Media

Congress Sells America Short

Mark Faulk

FaulkingTruth.com cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 20 September 2005

In yet another twist in the stock market scandal known as Stockgate, the Faulking Truth has learned that Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL), Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, has shelved a planned Senate Subcommittee Hearing investigating the issue. Originally scheduled for February of this year, and then postponed several times, the hearing, which has been advocated by Senator Robert Bennett (R-UT), has been cancelled indefinitely.

According to a reliable source inside of the planned investigation, “The authority and the responsibility to take the necessary steps to deal with the issue of naked short selling lies squarely at the feet of Senator Shelby, and he has chosen not to allow the planned Senate Banking Subcommittee hearing to go forward.” In an earlier interview with the same source, we were told that “Senator Shelby tends to grab things like this for his own purposes, and his own purposes don’t always mesh with what’s best for the public.”

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Article: Who’s Looking Out For You? SEC Critics Seeking Investigation

Article - Media

Who’s Looking Out For You?: SEC Critics Seeking Investigation

Mark Faulk

FaulkingTruth cited by RGM Communications via Wayback,  27 June 2004

The mission statement of the SEC is clearly worded and easy to understand: “The primary mission of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is to protect investors and maintain the integrity of the securities market.”

Last Wednesday, they adopted new rules concerning short-selling that accomplished neither goal. Instead, they passed a watered-down version of their earlier proposed regulation SHO, a version that did absolutely nothing to “protect investors and maintain the integrity of the securities market”. And unlike their mission statement, the new rules are neither clearly worded nor easy to understand. In fact, the only clear message was the “subliminal” one that the SEC sent to investors, which was, simply stated: “We don’t care”.

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