Article: The GameStop Mess Exposes the Naked Short Selling Scam

Article - Media, Publications

The GameStop Mess Exposes the Naked Short Selling Scam

LUCY KOMISAR, 25 February 2021

At the House Financial Services Committee hearing last week on the GameStop debacle, there was an elephant in the room: naked short selling.

Short selling, effectively betting that a stock will go down, involves a trader selling shares he does not own, hoping to buy them back at a lower price to make money on the spread. The trader is supposed to locate (or have a “reasonable belief” he can locate) or borrow the shares in brokerage accounts, and then transfer them to the buyer within two days. This accounts for as much as 50 percent of daily trading. Continue reading “Article: The GameStop Mess Exposes the Naked Short Selling Scam”

Letter: Marc Cohodes to Judge Jed Rakoff

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PDF (5 Pages): 20210218-Cohodes Submission Against Petit

“Second, Mr. Cohodes has never engaged in naked short selling (that is, he trades through brokers who find shares for him to borrow and he pays high interest fees to maintain his short positions). He was never part of any concerted illegal campaign to target MiMedx; his actions were his own.”

Comment: The above statement by a lawyer is easily challenged in court with evidence. Mr. Cohodes appears to be panicking. This time around it will cost him 10X to 100X what he was forced to pay Patrick Byrne.  We have it all. The matter of compromised judges and DOJ and SCC as a RICO organization are also on the table. DTCC will not survive a Special Prosecutor.

Article: Some lawmakers also shorted stocks, congressional records show

Article - Media

Some lawmakers also shorted stocks, congressional records show

Robert O’Harrow Jr., Dan Keating

The Washington Post, 5 May 2010

As Congress criticized Wall Street for the proliferation of risky derivatives investments and short-selling practices in recent years, some lawmakers privately made highly speculative investments in derivatives funds that sometimes aimed to profit from a decline in the overall performance of the stock market or Treasury bonds, congressional financial disclosure forms show.

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