Article: Bringing Down Bear Began as $1.7 Million of Options

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Bringing Down Bear Began as $1.7 Million of Options

Gary Matsumoto

Bloomberg cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 11 August 2008

On March 11, the day the Federal Reserve attempted to shore up confidence in the credit markets with a $200 billion lending program that for the first time monetized Wall Street’s devalued collateral, somebody else decided Bear Stearns Cos. was going to collapse.

In a gambit with such low odds of success that traders question its legitimacy, someone wagered $1.7 million that Bear Stearns shares would suffer an unprecedented decline within days. Options specialists are convinced that the buyer, or buyers, made a concerted effort to drive the fifth-biggest U.S. securities firm out of business and, in the process, reap a profit of more than $270 million.

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Notice: Public Statement by SEC Chairman Naked Short Selling Is One Problem a Slumping Market Shouldn’t Have

Notice

Public Statement by SEC Chairman:
Naked Short Selling Is One Problem a Slumping Market Shouldn’t Have

Chairman Christopher Cox

SEC.gov, 18 July 2008

The demise of IndyMac, coming on the heels of Bear Stearns’ desperate sale to JPMorgan Chase, is a sure sign of the fragility of today’s markets. What’s needed now, more than ever, is reliable information for investors and confidence that trading can be conducted without the illegal influence of manipulation.

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Testimony: Bud Burrell Comments on Amendments to Regulation SHO

Testimony

Bud Burrell Comments on Amendments to Regulation SHO

SEC, 13 July 2008

“August 1973 I started on Wall Street in Block Trading for Bache. Worked in all Major firms through the years.Traveled all over the world.

From $6 Billion per day Fails to deliver is now Over $13 1/2 billion per day.

There is More Naked Short shares in the market than there is Outstanding Shares.

We have allowed our Clearing systems to be Gamed, to the point where they are able to manipulate markets.”

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Article: Bringing Down Bear Stearns

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Bringing Down Bear Stearns

Bryan Burrough

Vanity Fair, 30 June 2008

On Monday, March 10, the rumor started: Bear Stearns was having liquidity problems. In fact, the maverick investment bank had around $18 billion in cash reserves. But soon the speculation created its own reality, and the race was on to keep Bear’s crisis from ravaging Wall Street. With the blow-by-blow from insiders, Bryan Burrough follows the players—Bear’s stunned executives, trigger-happy reporters at CNBC, a nervous Fed, a shadowy group of short-sellers—in what some believe was the greatest financial scandal in history.

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Article: The Secret Bailout of J. P. Morgan: How Insider Trading Looted Bear Stearns and the American Taxpayer

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The Secret Bailout of J. P. Morgan: How Insider Trading Looted Bear Stearns and the American Taxpayer

Ellen Brown

Global Research, 14 May 2008

The mother of all insider trades was pulled off in 1815, when London financier Nathan Rothschild led British investors to believe that the Duke of Wellington had lost to Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. In a matter of hours, British government bond prices plummeted. Rothschild, who had advance information, then swiftly bought up the entire market in government bonds, acquiring a dominant holding in England’s debt for pennies on the pound. Over the course of the nineteenth century, N. M. Rothschild would become the biggest bank in the world, and the five brothers would come to control most of the foreign-loan business of Europe. “Let me issue and control a nation’s money,” Rothschild boasted in 1838, “and I care not who writes its laws.”

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Article: Naked Fines

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Naked Fines

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 13 September 2006

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has received a deluge of requests to amend short-selling rules it enacted just two years ago as the New York Stock Exchange continues its efforts to enforce existing regulations.

JPMorgan Chase has become the fifth bank to be censured and fined by the NYSE’s regulatory division for violations of trading rules meant to curb abusive short-selling.

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Article: NYSE fines five firms for rule violations

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NYSE fines five firms for rule violations

James Langton

Investment Executive, 13 September 2006

NYSE Regulation announced that it has disciplined five firms for a variety of rule violations.

J.P. Morgan Securities Inc. was disciplined for violation of SEC rules on short sales, NYSE order rules and supervisory violations. It consented without admitting or denying guilt to findings of operational deficiencies concerning Regulation SHO, violating NYSE order rules, and books and records and supervisory violations.

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Article: JPMorgan faces $2.2B Fraud Lawsuit over Bonds

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JPMorgan faces $2.2B Fraud Lawsuit over Bonds

Reuters cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 3 February 2006

JPMorgan Chase faces a civil lawsuit accusing the No. 3 U.S. bank of defrauding bond investors and others out of at least $2.2 billion over more than 20 years.

The lawsuit, filed Tuesday with the U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, seeks class-action status.

It accuses New York-based JPMorgan and its predecessors of deleting records for $46.8 billion of bonds that investors had not cashed in, covering up its errors, refusing to pay back bondholders, and collecting fees it did not deserve.

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Article: SEC’s IPO probe expands to include Morgan Stanley

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SEC’s IPO probe expands to include Morgan Stanley

Investment Executive, 26 February 2003

“The Securities and Exchange Commission, expanding a probe into alleged IPO abuses, has signaled to Morgan Stanley that it may file civil charges alleging the securities firm doled out shares to investors based partly on their commitments to buy additional stock after trading began, people familiar with the matter say,” writes Randall Smith in today’s Wall Street Journal.

“The SEC staff has informally indicated to Morgan Stanley that it plans to send a so-called Wells notice notifying the firm of the planned charges, the people said. The development suggests the SEC’s investigation into such “laddering” of stock sold in initial public offerings could be heating up. The probe is one of the last major regulatory crackdowns on Wall Street excesses that characterized the 1990s stock-market bubble.”

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