Article: These 2 Meme Stocks Won’t Survive the Next Stock Market Crash

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These 2 Meme Stocks Won’t Survive the Next Stock Market Crash

Leo Sun,  26 March 2021

The Reddit-fueled short squeezes of GameStop (NYSE:GME) and other heavily shorted stocks earlier this year thrust the idea of “meme stocks” — equities that get aggressively promoted on social media platforms — into the broader market’s spotlight.

Some of those meme stocks actually have solid underlying businesses that could allow them to resist a market downturn. However, there are plenty of others with businesses that can’t possibly support their frothy valuations. Let’s take a look at two meme stocks that will likely burn their shareholders the next time the market stumbles.

1. Naked Brand
Shares of Naked Brand Group (NASDAQ:NAKD), a New Zealand-based retailer of intimate apparel and swimwear, surged from about $0.07 last October to an all-time high of $3.40 in late January. Nearly everyone who chased that rally and hung on got burned — the stock now trades at about $0.77 per share.

Naked’s rally had nothing to do with its fundamentals. It was identified as a short squeeze target on Reddit, and its name was cited in discussions about “naked shorting” — the illegal practice of shorting a stock without borrowing it first. Those discussions inexplicably evolved into a movement to promote the stock on Reddit, which caused it to rally alongside GameStop and other meme stocks in January.

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Article: Short Squeeze Stockbrokers And Hedge Funds Face Proposed Antitrust Class Action

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Joseph Saveri Law Firm | 21.02.02

On January 28, many brokerages abruptly and unilaterally restricted retail investors’ ability to buy long positions—in some cases removing the option to buy shares of the relevant securities while openly permitting them to sell their existing shares or prohibiting users from viewing the tickers for some or all of the relevant securities.

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Article: Why did Interactive Brokers restrict trading in GameStop and other companies?

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Why did Interactive Brokers restrict trading in GameStop and other companies?

George Sweeney, 29 January 2021

What is happening to GameStop shares?
GameStop shares have been hitting the news quite a lot recently. At first, it was simply due to their astronomical rise in value. Then people started looking into why the price was rising so much. After all, GameStop is a video game retailer that has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic and downloadable games.

Because of all the bad luck surrounding the company, they were one of the most shorted companies in the market. Short selling is when traders buy a company’s shares and then sell them, believing that their price will go down before they buy them back for a profit.

Why are there restrictions?

The reasons for the restrictions vary. Interactive Brokers have said their restrictions were created in order to protect the market and make sure there was enough liquidity.

Another concern they have is that they’ll be left to pick up the bill if their customers end up with big losses. That is why they’re increasing the minimum requirements people must meet in order to borrow money to trade.

If these shares all spiral down at the same time, their fear is that many traders won’t be able to pay back the money they’re borrowing for trading.

Other platforms have said they are using restrictions to:

Stop their service becoming overloaded. Provide some breathing room to maintain everything and look after other customers. Prevent investors losing lots of money during unusual volatility. Make sure they meet any regulatory requirements in their country.

However, some argue that limiting people’s ability to trade shares like GameStop freely is effectively market manipulation because: Many traders accept the volatility risk. Brokers are potentially limiting trading because of their own liquidity issues. Investors are not being allowed full control over their investments

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