Paper: Counterfeiting Stock

Paper

Counterfeiting Stock

Anna McParland

The Creation of Counterfeit Shares — There are a variety of names that the securities industry has dreamed up that are euphemisms for counterfeit shares. Don’t be fooled : Unless the short seller has actually borrowed a real share from the account of a long investor, the short sale is counterfeit. It doesn’t matter what you call it and it may become non–counterfeit if a share is later borrowed, but until then, there are more shares in the system than the company has sold.

The magnitude of the counterfeiting is hundreds of millions of shares every day, and it may be in the billions. The real answer is locked within the prime brokers and the DTC. Incidentally, counterfeiting of securities is as

It is estimated that 1000 small companies have been put out of business by the shorts.

PDF (12 Pages): Paper Counterfeiting Stock

Article: In Pursuit of the Naked Short by Alexis Stokes

Article - Academic

In Pursuit of the Naked Short

Alexis Stokes, Texas State University

Journal of Law and Business 5/1 (Spring 2009)

This article explores the origins of naked short-selling litigation; considers
the failures of significant naked short-selling lawsuits in federal court;
surveys the obstacles erected collectively by constitutional standing requirements, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, brokerage firms, death spiral financiers, and the Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation; examines the efficacy of Regulation SHO, SEC rule 10b-21, and new FINRA rules; discusses recent state legislation and state court litigation; and identifies non-litigation options to curb naked short-selling. Ultimately, this article seeks to answer the question: If manipulative naked short-selling is more than a mythological scapegoat for
small cap failure, what remedies are, or should be, available?

PDF (62 Pages): Article In Pursuit of the Naked Short

Web: Who Caused the SEC to Enter an Amicus Brief on behalf of DTCC in the Nanopierce Case?

Web

Who Caused the SEC to Enter an Amicus Brief on behalf of DTCC in the Nanopierce Case?

Bud Burrell

Sanity Check via Wayback, 5 February 2006

It was my understanding, and that of many I know, that the SEC had told Counsel for the victims a year ago in a special purpose meeting, that they would NOT be filing an Amicus brief for DTCC in the matter of Nanopierce.

So what happened to change that position, and Why? Who got to the SEC on this issue, causing a change of mind and position? The only units able to put this kind of pressure on the SEC is either our Congress, or the Senate. So which was it.

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Article: Future-Priced Convertible Securities & The Outlook For “Death Spiral” Securities-Fraud Litigation

Academic

Future-Priced Convertible Securities & The Outlook For
“Death Spiral” Securities-Fraud Litigation

Zachary T. Knepper

bepress Legal Series, 29 August 2004

In recent years, many companies in the United States have issued so-called “Future-Priced Convertible Securities.” These companies tend to be small, thinly-traded, and (most importantly) desperate for cash, and look to the Future-Priced Convertible Security as a necessary means of financing to keep their businesses operating. FuturePriced Convertible Securities are thus credited by some with providing an important form of financing in the marketplace.1 Yet these securities are also a source of controversy. Many companies have wound up regretting issuing these instruments, after watching their stock values tumble and their market capitalizations dry-up subsequent to issuing these securities. Issuers have even started to sue.

PDF (71 pages): Future-Priced Convertible Securities & The Outlook For
“Death Spiral” Securities-Fraud Litigation

Article: DTCC Chief Spokesperson Denies Existence of Lawsuit

Article - Media

DTCC Chief Spokesperson Denies Existence of Lawsuit

Financial Wire cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 11 May 2004

FinancialWire received a confidential email between a reporter and Stuart Z. Goldstein, Managing Director of Corporate Communications for the Depository Trust and Clearing Corp. in which Goldstein was represented as denying that a lawsuit filed by Nanopierce Technologies (OTCBB: NPCT) exists.

The chief spokesperson for the DTCC, whose board of directors represent a who’s who of financial entities, including Lehman Brothers (NYSE: LEH), Citigroup / Solomon Smith Barney’s Corporate Investment Bank (NYSE: C), and Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MWD), was quoted as stating that the “lawsuit” did not exist and was simply “charges being leveled by internet crackpots.”

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