Web: Wikipedia – Naked Short Selling

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Naked Short Selling

Naked short selling, or naked shorting, is the practice of short-selling a tradable asset of any kind without first borrowing the security or ensuring that the security can be borrowed, as is conventionally done in a short sale. When the seller does not obtain the shares within the required time frame, the result is known as a “failure to deliver” (“FTD”). The transaction generally remains open until the shares are acquired by the seller, or the seller’s broker settles the trade.

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Article: Naked and Confused

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Naked and Confused

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 12 February 2007

How a tiny software outfit fell victim to an illegal but unrestrained practice known as naked short-selling.

Most investors have never heard of Sedona (otcbb: SDNA.OB news people ) Corp., a piddling Pennsylvania outfit that sells customer relationship management software for small U.S. banks and credit unions. But to a rogue band of short-selling hedge fund managers, Sedona was prime meat.

Article: Naked [Short Selling] Horror

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Naked Horror

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 25 August 2006

Suspicious trading last year in shares of Global Links, a small Nevada real estate holding company, was far more intense than previously thought.

Data released to Patch earlier this month had shown trade fails of 10 million shares starting in mid-April, a time when 4 million shares of Global Links were issued and outstanding.

Article: Hedge Fund Hell

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Hedge Fund Hell

Liz Moyer

Forbes cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 28 July 2006

Toronto-based Fairfax Financial Holdings filed a $5 billion lawsuit against SAC Capital, Rocker Partners and a number of other hedge funds, claiming they manipulated the insurance company’s stock, shearing its market cap by one-third.

Earlier this week, the regulatory arm of NYSE Group, fined Daiwa Securities America, Goldman Sachs Execution & Clearing, Credit Suisse Securities, and Citigroup Global Markets $1.25 million for violations of Regulation SHO–a rule put in place in January 2005 to clamp down on abuses–related to how they handle and monitor short-sale transactions by hedge funds and other clients.

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Article: Short-Sellers Are Burned by Novastar

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Short-Sellers Are Burned by Novastar

Roddy Boyd

New York Post, 16 April 2006

One Midwestern financial company, long a target of short-sellers, has deployed an infrequently used tactic to inflict pain on its naysayers: Its management has put in place a strategy that consistently makes money.

The stock of Novastar Financial, a Kansas City, Mo.-based home-equity real estate investment trust, has been a battleground between long-term holders in love with its juicy dividends and short-sellers who suspect that the company has massive default risk with those loans.

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