Web: Wikipedia – Naked Short Selling

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Naked Short Selling

Naked short selling, or naked shorting, is the practice of short-selling a tradable asset of any kind without first borrowing the security or ensuring that the security can be borrowed, as is conventionally done in a short sale. When the seller does not obtain the shares within the required time frame, the result is known as a “failure to deliver” (“FTD”). The transaction generally remains open until the shares are acquired by the seller, or the seller’s broker settles the trade.

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Article: Naked and Confused

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Naked and Confused

Liz Moyer

Forbes, 12 February 2007

How a tiny software outfit fell victim to an illegal but unrestrained practice known as naked short-selling.

Most investors have never heard of Sedona (otcbb: SDNA.OB news people ) Corp., a piddling Pennsylvania outfit that sells customer relationship management software for small U.S. banks and credit unions. But to a rogue band of short-selling hedge fund managers, Sedona was prime meat.

Article: Hedge Fund Hell

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Hedge Fund Hell

Liz Moyer

Forbes cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 28 July 2006

Toronto-based Fairfax Financial Holdings filed a $5 billion lawsuit against SAC Capital, Rocker Partners and a number of other hedge funds, claiming they manipulated the insurance company’s stock, shearing its market cap by one-third.

Earlier this week, the regulatory arm of NYSE Group, fined Daiwa Securities America, Goldman Sachs Execution & Clearing, Credit Suisse Securities, and Citigroup Global Markets $1.25 million for violations of Regulation SHO–a rule put in place in January 2005 to clamp down on abuses–related to how they handle and monitor short-sale transactions by hedge funds and other clients.

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Article: Short-Sellers Are Burned by Novastar

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Short-Sellers Are Burned by Novastar

Roddy Boyd

New York Post, 16 April 2006

One Midwestern financial company, long a target of short-sellers, has deployed an infrequently used tactic to inflict pain on its naysayers: Its management has put in place a strategy that consistently makes money.

The stock of Novastar Financial, a Kansas City, Mo.-based home-equity real estate investment trust, has been a battleground between long-term holders in love with its juicy dividends and short-sellers who suspect that the company has massive default risk with those loans.

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