Article: The Truth About Naked Short Selling Commentary

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The Truth About Naked Short Selling: Commentary

John Olagues

Investopedia, 25 June 2019

The basic form of short selling is selling stock that you borrow from an owner and do not own yourself. In essence, you deliver the borrowed shares. Another form is to sell stock that you do not own and are not borrowing from someone. Here you owe the shorted shares to the buyer but “fail to deliver.” This form is called naked short selling.

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Article: Mechanics of short selling, naked short selling and synthetic short selling

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Mechanics of short selling, naked short selling and synthetic short selling

John Olagues

321gold, 16 April 2009

There is much in the media these days about short selling, naked short selling and the “uptick rule.” Some claim that naked short sellers collude with “Rumor Mongers” to collapse stock like Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers and so on. There is little in the media about the specific mechanics of short selling or the concept of synthetic short selling.

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Article: Bringing Down Bear Began as $1.7 Million of Options

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Bringing Down Bear Began as $1.7 Million of Options

Gary Matsumoto

Bloomberg cited by RGM Communications via Wayback, 11 August 2008

On March 11, the day the Federal Reserve attempted to shore up confidence in the credit markets with a $200 billion lending program that for the first time monetized Wall Street’s devalued collateral, somebody else decided Bear Stearns Cos. was going to collapse.

In a gambit with such low odds of success that traders question its legitimacy, someone wagered $1.7 million that Bear Stearns shares would suffer an unprecedented decline within days. Options specialists are convinced that the buyer, or buyers, made a concerted effort to drive the fifth-biggest U.S. securities firm out of business and, in the process, reap a profit of more than $270 million.

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Article: The Secret Bailout of J. P. Morgan: How Insider Trading Looted Bear Stearns and the American Taxpayer

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The Secret Bailout of J. P. Morgan: How Insider Trading Looted Bear Stearns and the American Taxpayer

Ellen Brown

Global Research, 14 May 2008

The mother of all insider trades was pulled off in 1815, when London financier Nathan Rothschild led British investors to believe that the Duke of Wellington had lost to Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. In a matter of hours, British government bond prices plummeted. Rothschild, who had advance information, then swiftly bought up the entire market in government bonds, acquiring a dominant holding in England’s debt for pennies on the pound. Over the course of the nineteenth century, N. M. Rothschild would become the biggest bank in the world, and the five brothers would come to control most of the foreign-loan business of Europe. “Let me issue and control a nation’s money,” Rothschild boasted in 1838, “and I care not who writes its laws.”

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