Politician: Eliot Spitzer

People, Politician

Eliot Laurence Spitzer  (born June 10, 1959) is an American politician, attorney, educator, and real estate developer. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 54th Governor of New York.

After serving for six years as a prosecutor with the office of the Manhattan District Attorney, Spitzer worked as an attorney in private practice with several New York law firms. He was then elected to two four-year terms as the Attorney General of New York, serving from 1999 to 2006; during this period, Spitzer became known as the “Sheriff of Wall Street” for his efforts to curb corruption in the financial services industry. Spitzer was elected Governor of New York in 2006 and served as the 54th Governor of New York from January 1, 2007, until his resignation on March 17, 2008, in the midst of a prostitution scandal. Continue reading “Politician: Eliot Spitzer”

Article: Wall Street’s Bailout Hustle

Article - Media

Wall Street’s Bailout Hustle

Matt Taibbi

Rolling Stone, 17 February 2010

On January 21st, Lloyd Blankfein left a peculiar voicemail message on the work phones of his employees at Goldman Sachs. Fast becoming America’s pre-eminent Marvel Comics supervillain, the CEO used the call to deploy his secret weapon: a pair of giant, nuclear-powered testicles. In his message, Blankfein addressed his plan to pay out gigantic year-end bonuses amid widespread controversy over Goldman’s role in precipitating the global financial crisis.

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Web: Rod Young, Eagletech CEO’s Open Letter on the Shorting Scandal, a Classic

Web

Rod Young, Eagletech CEO’s Open Letter on the Shorting Scandal, a Classic

Bud Burrell, Rod Young

Sanity Check via Wayback, 17 January 2006

Today, more than one month later, the records have not been forthcoming as ordered by the court. Instead, as First Deputy General Counsel for the DTCC, I believe you have undertaken a campaign to disseminate misinformation, lies, and half-truths when confronted with facts made public by your detractors.On March 5, 2005 one day after the announcement of the aforementioned court ruling, your interview @dtcc.com, entitled “Naked Short Selling and the Stock Borrow Program”, stated: “One of these companies has been cited for failing to file financial statements since 2001.” Congratulations! You did get one right. On February 15, 2005, the Securities and Exchange Commission deemed it necessary for the protection of investors to institute proceedings pursuant to Section 12(j) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 In the Matter of Eagletech Communications, Inc., Respondent.

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Article: STATE PRESSES FRAUD PROBE

Article - Media, Publications

STATE PRESSES FRAUD PROBE

DIANE LEVICK, 20 October 2004

Connecticut stepped up its own probe of insurance misconduct Tuesday as Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, convinced that there is bid-rigging and other fraud here, issued at least 20 subpoenas to insurance companies and brokers.

Blumenthal’s latest move follows a lawsuit last week and arrests by the New York attorney general’s office, which is investigating manipulation of bids and questionable payment practices involving insurance brokers and companies. Continue reading “Article: STATE PRESSES FRAUD PROBE”

Article: Mighty Merrill Lynch bogs down in legal troubles

Article - Media

Mighty Merrill Lynch bogs down in legal troubles

Thor Valdmanis

Securities Arbitration, 10 October 2002

Douglas and Deborah Millar are about to become $7.7 million richer. The Pennsylvania couple didn’t buy a state lottery ticket. Instead, they played another popular game of chance: Sue Your Broker.

In granting one of the largest awards on record six weeks ago, a private arbitration panel ruled that Merrill Lynch failed to advise the Millars on how to protect the value of a stake in former Internet high-flier FreeMarkets that in better times was worth $48 million. Merrill has appealed, but legal scholars say arbitration awards are rarely overturned.

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