Article: Robinhood Restricted-Trading Suits Will Play Out In Florida

Article - Media, Publications

Robinhood Restricted-Trading Suits Will Play Out In Florida

Elise Hansen, 02 April 2021

Dozens of lawsuits against stock-trading app Robinhood over its move to block users from buying shares of GameStop and other volatile stocks will be centralized and moved to the Southern District of Florida, the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said.

Panel Chair Karen K. Caldwell said Thursday that even though the suits have varied defendants and legal claims, there’s enough common ground to centralize the cases. Many of the plaintiffs and all of the defendants supported centralization, the order noted. Continue reading “Article: Robinhood Restricted-Trading Suits Will Play Out In Florida”

Article: Trading hot stocks like GameStop seems fun until you look beneath the surface

Article - Media

Trading hot stocks like GameStop seems fun until you look beneath the surface

Congress is asking questions about whether middlemen or “market makers” like Citadel that execute stock trades really give small investors the best prices.

Gretchen Morgenson, ABCNews, 18 February 2021

Market makers like Citadel make money by pocketing the difference between the price at which they buy shares — the bid — and the price they receive from selling them to Robinhood clients, the offer. Other firms in the business are Virtu Americas, G1X Execution Services and Two Sigma Securities.

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Article: GameStop Isn’t a Popular Uprising

Article - Media

Robert J. Shapiro | 21.02.03

The investors’ struggle over the video game retailer GameStop has been cast as a David versus Goliath story. Allegedly, this is the tale of scrappy, small online day traders buying shares of a beleaguered company to thwart a hedge fund scheme to take it down. Like GameStop’s stock, this narrative is mostly speculation because the facts about the buyers and sellers and their trades are hidden in the records of Robinhood, the new online trading platform, as well as Charles Schwab and other traditional broker-dealers. Only the SEC could demand to inspect those records.

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Naked Short Selling: The Truth Is Much Worse Than You Have Been Told

Article - Media

Naked Short Selling: The Truth Is Much Worse Than You Have Been Told

By James Stafford – Feb 02, 2021, 3:20 PM CST, OilPrice.com

There is a massive threat to our capital markets, the free market in general, and fair dealings overall. And no, it’s not China. It’s a homegrown threat that everyone has been afraid to talk about.

Until now.  That fear has now turned into rage.

The naked truth is this: Investors stand no chance in the face of naked short sellers. It’s a game rigged in the favor of a sophisticated short cartel and Wall Street giants.

Continue reading “Naked Short Selling: The Truth Is Much Worse Than You Have Been Told”

Article: VirnetX Class Accuses Big Brokers of Naked Short Sales

Article - Media

VirnetX Class Accuses Big Brokers of Naked Short Sales

Chris Fry

Courthouse News Service, 19 December 2016

Investors claim in a federal class action that Goldman Sachs and other banking giants suppressed the share price of VirnetX, “a leader in mobile security technology.”

In addition to Goldman Sachs, the Dec. 14 complaint in Bergen County Superior Court takes aim at Merrill Lynch, Credit Suisse, TD Ameritrade, Charles Schwab and the Bank of New York Mellon. The case is the Top Download for Courthouse News on Monday.

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Filing: SEC v Schwab

Filing

SEC v Schwab

19 January 2016

A Charles Schwab Corp subsidiary and a former customer told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Friday that an agency judge overreached when she found them liable for an alleged naked short-selling scheme and ordered them to pay $8.2 million in sanctions.

PDF (3 pages): SEC v Schwab

Web: SEC Charges optionsXpress and Five Individuals Involved in Abusive Naked Short Selling Scheme

Web

SEC Charges optionsXpress and Five Individuals
Involved in Abusive Naked Short Selling Scheme

SEC, 16 April 2012

The SEC’s Division of Enforcement alleges that Chicago-based optionsXpress failed to satisfy its close-out obligations under Regulation SHO by repeatedly engaging in a series of sham “reset” transactions designed to give the illusion that the firm had purchased securities of like kind and quantity. The firm and customer Jonathan I. Feldman engaged in these sham reset transactions in a number of securities, resulting in continuous failures to deliver. Regulation SHO requires the delivery of equity securities to a registered clearing agency when delivery is due, generally three days after the trade date (T+3). If no delivery is made by that time, the firm must purchase or borrow the securities to close out the failure-to-deliver position by no later than the beginning of regular trading hours on the next day (T+4).

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